Bill Miller

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Bill Miller is a 35-year veteran of the journalistic trenches and a freelance writer for the past 10 years. In his previous life, Bill was a reporter and editor with the Victoria Times-Colonist, Reuters's Quebec correspondent, Bureau Chief for United Press International on Parliament Hill, and reporter for the Ottawa Citizen. Honesty compels him also to confess that his first full-time job was with The Wall Street Journal in New York City, where he first realized the planet was doomed unless humans changed their ways.

Bill Miller is a 35-year veteran of the journalistic trenches and a freelance writer for the past 10 years.

In his previous life, Bill was a reporter and editor with the Victoria Times-Colonist, Reuters's Quebec correspondent, Bureau Chief for United Press International on Parliament Hill, and reporter for the Ottawa Citizen. Honesty compels him also to confess that his first full-time job was with The Wall Street Journal in New York City, where he first realized the planet was doomed unless humans changed their ways.

Global warming is costly, devastating to infrastructure in Alaska

A new study has found that many of Alaska’s roads, runways, railroads and water and sewer systems will wear out more quickly and cost more to fix because of climate change. From now to 2030, rising temperatures, melting permafrost, reduction of polar ice and increased flooding are expected to boost repair and replacement costs by 20 per cent to as much as $6.1 billion US.

Developing nations have crucial, but unspecified, post-Kyoto role on climate change

China, India, Brazil and other emerging nations must be persuaded not to expect sustainable growth without taking environmental degradation into account, says an editorial in Asahi Shimbun. While developed nations such as the U.S. bear greater responsibility for fighting global warming, it is also necessary to pinpoint the “differentiated” role cited by the UN for developing countries.

World Heritage sites threatened by climate change; UN urged to seek carbon cuts

A United Nations conference has been urged to protect six World Heritage sites, including Mount Everest and Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, from global warming. Campaigners hope to persuade the group to reverse last year's decision to reject cuts in greenhouse-gas emissions.

Rich nations blamed for global warming, but not for all the right reasons

As forecast, China has overtaken the U.S. in carbon-dioxide emissions due largely to China’s heavy reliance on coal. Another factor is its well-publicized population of 1.3 billion. But per-capita emissions are much higher in developed countries, where populations are exploding due to immigration. The U.S. already releases four times the carbon per-capita each year as China. And the U.S. population, which has been doubling every 40 years, is headed for one billion by the end of this century!

British Columbia’s capital set to fine idlers over global warming

Under a new bylaw, the City of Victoria will fine drivers from $50 to $200 for leaving vehicles running unnecessarily. Such behavior includes waiting for passengers, driving through fast-food lanes, stopping at rail crossings, waiting to park or refuel, and other infractions.

U.S. Senate raises mileage requirement for cars but leaves taxes on oil industry untouched

The new energy bill was seen as a major defeat for automobile manufacturers and a stunning victory for oil companies, who escaped a proposed $32 billion tax increase. Ominously, President Bush said the Senate measure fell far short of his goals.

California continues to lead the charge against global warming

The U.S. Supreme Court has recently endorsed California's strategy to regulate greenhouse gases from vehicles, validating the state's claim emissions should be classified as air pollutants over the objections of the Bush administration.

At least a dozen other states are expected to follow should the Environmental Protection Agency give California the right to limit auto emissions. A final decision is expected, coveniently, after Bush leaves the White House next year.

Surprise ally delivers a kick against global warming

A Colorado sports organization is pitching itself as the world’s first carbon-neutral soccer team . Based in Boulder, where the city council voted last year to adhere to the Kyoto Protocol – something the U.S. government has never done – the Colorado Rapids under-23 organization has vowed all carbon emissions produced by the team are offset by carbon reduction.

 

Carbon ranching pushes rainforest preservation in global-warming battle

Carbon ranching is a way to protect rainforests, which inhale carbon dioxide and exhale oxygen to help cool the planet. At present, these woodlands are threatened by logging, mining, cattle production and, increasingly, sugar and palm oil plantations to fuel growing demand for ethanol. In fact, destruction of the world’s tropical forests now contributes more to global warming than China’s well-publicized industrial-pollution surge.

A pledge to help poorer nations reduce carbon emissions caused by slashing and burning their forests was in the final communiqué issued at the Group of 8 summit in Germany. The Bush administration has financed some tropical forest conservation projects in the past. Now, as Congress energetically debates new climate-change legislation, greater incentives for carbon ranching are advocated. As usual, the solution is simple economics.

Global-warming is the ‘900-pound gorilla’ of policy decisions

Western U.S. governors laid to rest this week much remaining doubt about a human role in climate change; now they must find workable policies to avert global disaster 10 to 50 years in the future.

As one governor described it, “We are looking for the silver lining in a black cloud.” But even as they grappled over the scientific consensus, religious and political skeptics were scrambling to discredit it.

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