Bill Miller

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Bill Miller is a 35-year veteran of the journalistic trenches and a freelance writer for the past 10 years. In his previous life, Bill was a reporter and editor with the Victoria Times-Colonist, Reuters's Quebec correspondent, Bureau Chief for United Press International on Parliament Hill, and reporter for the Ottawa Citizen. Honesty compels him also to confess that his first full-time job was with The Wall Street Journal in New York City, where he first realized the planet was doomed unless humans changed their ways.

Bill Miller is a 35-year veteran of the journalistic trenches and a freelance writer for the past 10 years.

In his previous life, Bill was a reporter and editor with the Victoria Times-Colonist, Reuters's Quebec correspondent, Bureau Chief for United Press International on Parliament Hill, and reporter for the Ottawa Citizen. Honesty compels him also to confess that his first full-time job was with The Wall Street Journal in New York City, where he first realized the planet was doomed unless humans changed their ways.

Misquoted scientists cry foul over polar bear editorial

A Vancouver Province newspaper editorial criticizing the U.S. government for proposing polar bears as a possible threatened species has the scientists it quoted crying foul. Calling the US decision “a classic case of blinkered thinking,” the Province claims that Mitchell Taylor, manager of wildlife research for the Nunavut government, has been quoted as saying that, except for Hudson Bay, “polar bears appear to be overabundant.”

“I don't even know what “overabundant” means,” said Taylor.

Global warming, El Nino set to make 2007 warmest year on record, experts say

Global warming and El Nino are forecast to join forces for a more turbulent climate this year. Combined, they are set to bring extreme conditions across the globe and make 2007 warmer than 1998, the hottest year on record. It is likely temperatures will also exceed 2006, which was declared in December the hottest in Britain since 1659 and the sixth warmest in global records.

Bush administration waffles over Arctic ice but science doesn't

As reported, the Bush Administration has proposed listing polar bears as a threatened species. But it's still unclear whether it's going to curb greenhouse-gas emissions to secure their survival.

Bush Administration to list polar bears as threatened species

Responding to pressure from environmental groups, the Bush Administration is proposing to list polar bears as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. Environmentalists hope the move will lead to a curb on greenhouse-gas emissions.

Chicago utility to cut emissions, possibly plants

Three of Chicago's main sources of greenhouse-gas emissions will close or become cleaner under a new deal with the city. New standards are to be met by 2009 for mercury, 2012 for nitrogen oxide and 2018 for sulfur dioxide.

Utility industry clings to coal despite growing opposition

Power companies are mounting new plans for coal-fired plants despite growing public and political opposition to greenhouse-gas emissions. This comes amid expectations those emissions eventually will be subject to federal restrictions, especially after the recent Democratic congressional sweep. Even some industry officials are cautiously jumping on side. Are coal's days numbered?

Victoria newspaper raps skeptic knuckles

The Victoria Times Colonist has taken a swipe at skeptics in a recent editorial acknowledging climate change and the role played by greenhouse-gas emissions in global warming. In the same issue, Prince Charles says he intends to revise his travel plans in a bid to avert global warming.

Inhofe's hot-air balloon raises temperatures over global warming

Sen. James Inhofe, Outgoing Environment and Public Works Committee chair, has once again tripped over the facts in his mission to stifle the scientific consensus that humans are to blame for climate change. But his successor on the committee appears to be singing a different tune. Are policy changes in the offing?

Tim Ball's better, warmer world at odds with new famine forecast

New forecasts say climate change will reduce South Asia’s wheat-producing area by 50 per cent. The Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR) urges accelerated development of new strains of maize, wheat, rice and sorghum. CGIAR links 15 non-profit research institutes around the world working mainly on agriculture in developing countries and the tropics.

Coal, coal everywhere

A recent New York Times editorial shows a black and smoky future for electrical generation in the US.

To quote: “TXU, a giant Texas energy company , that it intends to build 11 new coal-fired power plants in Texas, plus another dozen or so coal-fired monsters elsewhere in the country. All told, this would be the nation’s largest single coal-oriented construction campaign in years.”

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