Jim Hoggan

Primary tabs

Jim Hoggan's picture

Personal Information

Twitter URL
Profile Info

Jim Hoggan is one of Canada’s most respected public-relations professionals and the president and owner of the Vancouver PR firm Hoggan & Associates.

A law school graduate with a longstanding passion for social justice, Jim also serves as chair of the David Suzuki Foundation—the nation’s most influential environmental organization—and as a Trustee of the Dalai Lama Center for Peace and Education.

Jim is the co-founder of Stonehouse Standing Circle, an innovative public-engagement and communications think-tank, and the former chair of The Climate Project Canada—Al Gore’s global education and advocacy organization. He also led the Province of British Columbia’s Green Energy Advisory Task Force on Community Relations and First Nations Partnerships.

Jim is the co-founder of the influential website DeSmogBlog and the author of two books, Do the Right Thing: PR Tips for Skeptical Public, and Climate Cover-Up: The Crusade to Deny Global Warming. He speaks, writes, and presents widely on public attitudes toward sustainability, climate change, and the environment.

"Ambiguous scientific statements about climate are hyped by those with a vested interest in alarm"

Think about that statement: “those with a vested interest in alarm.”
The quote comes from a Wall Street Journal article by Richard Lindzen, the Alfred P. Sloan Professor of Atmospheric Science at MIT.

Climate Change Denial - Breaking the Holocaust Link

There has been an increasing amount of coverage lately about the (anticipated) death of free speech - about the demonizing of people who deny climate change.

This is a dangerous and slightly desperate trend, because it tends to remove climate science from the climate change debate. It also preys on journalists' darkest fears: that the scourge of censorship, once unleashed, will invade every aspect of their practice.

The most recent outcry in defence of climate change denial arose when the prestigious UK science body, the Royal Society, made the unusual public gesture of demanding that ExxonMobil stop funding organizations that attack the climate change consensus.

Denying Dan: Exxon's Corporate Giving Explained

Astroturf: The Only Grass That Withstands Toxic Friends of Science

There are few parties in the public realm that are more credible than a “grassroots organization” - a group of citizens who rise up with no agenda other than to speak frankly about a public issue. Politicians are inevitably suspect and businesses are clearly self-interested, so reporters are always searching for the “common man” - the “person on the street” - or from impartial experts. No news source wraps up those characteristics more efficiently than the true grass roots organization.

Suncor: Best of a Bad Lot?

A European research firm has identified Canadian tar sands giant Suncor among the world's top 19 oil and gas companies as the best performer in generating carbon reduction strategies.

Chevron, ExxonMobil and EnCana were identified as the three worst.

Schwarzenegger: the Debate on Climate Change is over

ABC's Bill Blakemore leaves no question where Cali. Governor Schwarzenegger stands on the science behind climate change:

“I say the [global warming] debate is over. We know the science,” California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger declared forcefully at a recent United Nations summit. “We see the threat, and we know the time for action is now.”

And if you don't believe Arnie, check out these factoids:

Scientists Bang on with Analysis of Media Muddle

It would be nice if we public relations and media types could comment on climate science with the same sense of intelligent self-assurance that climate scientists J.A. Curry, P.J. Webster and G.J. Holland bring to this analysis of the effects of politics and media on public debates about science.

These three scientists were among four authors (including H.R. Chang) of a 2005 Science magazine paper that argued this:

A Response from "the Imam of anti-corporatist fundamentalism"

I am still stammering at the offensive, incompetent and hysterical goofiness of Terence Corcoran's diatribe yesterday in the  Financial Post.

I have a longish list of complaints and objections, but let me present just two here today.

First, the suggestion that I have an anti-corporate bias is silly. (And the implicit anti-Islamic characterization is, at the very least, racially offensive.) For the past 25 years, I have been running a nicely successful public relations business, which itself is incorporated. I have been doing all those things that corporations do: paying rent, paying taxes, paying employees, participating in the economy in a direct way (rather than as a voyeur) - and giving the best advice I can think of to other corporations.

Communicating on Climate: the Bad, the Ugly ... and the Possible

The excellent UK Institute for Public Policy Research (not to be confused with the right-wingy National Center for Public Policy Research) has released a research paper on climate change communication entitled, Warm Words: How are we telling the climate change story and can we tell it better?

The paper, at 28 pages not counting notes, is a little dense, a little academic - a little full of consultantspeak. But the content is impressive. The IPPR analysis of the climate change conversation in Britain seems intelligent and the authors (linguist Gill Ereaut and writer Nat Segnit) make observations that appear broadly applicable.

Climate Change Denial Explained ...

“It is difficult to get a man to understand something when his salary depends upon his not understanding it.”

Among the ideologues in the climate change denial camp, this quote has several strikes against it. First, it was penned by the Pulitzer Prize winning journalist Upton Sinclair, a socialist firebrand whose early investigative journalism led to the passage of the Pure Food and Drugs Act and the Meat Inspection Act, both in 1906.

A journalist, a socialist, an advocate for regulating the free market; actually, that's three strikes right there.

Worse still, the quote warranted a two-page spread in Al Gore's book, An Inconvenient Truth, a fact that is guaranteed to rile those defending America's right to be wrong on climate change.