Richard Littlemore

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Co-author (with Jim Hoggan) of the award-winning Climate Cover-up: The Crusade to Deny Global Warming, Richard has been Editor of the DeSmogBlog since its inception in 2005. Originally a newspaper reporter (the Ottawa Citizen, the Winnipeg Tribune, the Vancouver Sun), Richard has, since 1995, split his career between magazine journalism, activism and politics and corporate communications. On projects specific to climate change, he wrote the David Suzuki Foundation’s first public information package on global warming in 1996, was vice-chair of the Greater Vancouver Regional District's Air Quality Committee in 1996 and 1997 and sat as a delegate to the Canadian government's (failed) Kyoto Implementation Process from 1997 to 1999. Richard is a regular speech writer for many business and academic leaders.

California Courting Climate Change Advantage

When California started insisting, in the late 1960s, that automakers clean up exhaust emissions, industry screamed at the notion, threatening that the state's tough standards would bankrupt car owners and put the industry out of business.

Forty-odd years later, North American's love affair with the car has reached new heights of rapture and the air in every major city is more breathable than it was in the mid-70s, despite a tripling of  the number of vehicles on the street during those years.

NASA Makes Veiled Attempt to Silence Climate Comment

The New York Times is reporting that,

The top climate scientist at NASA says the Bush administration has tried to stop him from speaking out since he gave a lecture last month calling for prompt reductions in emissions of greenhouse gases linked to global warming.”

Terry Corcoran: King of Canadian Climate Change Deniers

Among major media figures in Canada, few people can claim as much credit as the National Post's Terrance Corcoran in the prolonged and woefully effective campaign to mislead the Canadian public on the science and policies regarding climate change.

As a business columnist in the Globe and Mail in the 1990s, Corcoran was reported to run shrieking into the managing editor's office any time a (well-documented) science story crept into the pages of what was then the nation's only national newspaper. As a result, the mid-level editors lived in fear and the environment reporters threw up their hands when asked why the Globe wasn't covering the story

Canada to Bail Out of Kyoto Agreement

Conservative Party Leader (and prime minister in waiting) Stephen Harper appeared to confirm last night in a CBC interview that he will remove Canada as a signatory to the Kyoto Agreement should he win election on Monday, Feb. 23, 2006.

Harper argues - rightly - that Canada wasted the last decade while the Liberal government of then-prime minister Jean Chretien dithered over how to achieve Kyoto targets. Chretien's biggest fear during the late '90s was that he would further alienate Albertans, whose robust economy rests heavily on fossil fuels. Chretien was also denied his usual ally in Ontario, as the then-Conservative provincial government refused to participate in any negotiations on reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

A Strenuously Balanced View on Climate Science

This New Scientist feature ( Climate change: Menace or myth?) is an older piece, missing some of the big news in the last year that has bolstered the scientific consensus yet further, but it is, nevertheless, a painstakingly fair effort to weigh the arguments for and against climate change - even giving the last word to ExxonMobil's client scientists.

Wet Coast Update

It was sunny in Vancouver yesterday, robbing soggy residents of the record for most consecutive rainy days. Rumour has it that Seattle is still in the hunt. And Vancouver is also on track to record the rainiest January and the rainiest winter.

The Perverse Pleasure of Breaking Records

Credit first to Gary Mason of the Globe and Mail, who in a Vancouver weather story on Jan. 10, 2006 offered this “old joke.”

A newcomer to Vancouver arrives and it's raining. He gets up the next day and it's still raining. It rains the day after that and the day after that. He goes for lunch five days later and it's still pouring. He sees a young boy walking down the street, and he says, “Does it every stop raining here?”

The Ethical Vacuum of Flat Earth Journalism

The Salem Oregon Statesman Journal ran an opinion piece today that declared, conclusively: “Global-Warming Fears Pointless.”

The article was a prescription for inaction, a recommendation that we should all throw our hands up in despair over our inability to understand or affect climate change.

It was also irresponsible journalism of the worst sort.