Ross Gelbspan

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Ross Gelbspan retired several years ago after a 31-year career in journalism as a reporter. As special projects editor of The Boston Globe, he conceived, directed and edited a series of articles that won a Pulitzer Prize in 1984.

Ross Gelbspan retired several years ago after a 31-year career in journalism as a reporter. As special projects editor of The Boston Globe, he conceived, directed and edited a series of articles that won a Pulitzer Prize in 1984.

In 1995, he co-authored an article on climate change and the spread of infectious disease which appeared in the Outlook Section of The Washington Post. His article on climate change, which appeared on the cover of the December, 1995 issue of Harper's Magazine, was a finalist for a National Magazine Award.

In 1997, he published a book on the global climate crisis titled: The Heat Is On: The High Stakes Battle Over Earth's Threatened Climate (Perseus Books). The book has also been published in German, Italian and Portuguese. (An updated U.S. paperback edition was published in 1998 (Perseus Books), as: The Heat Is On: the Climate Crisis, the Cover-Up, the Prescription).

The book received very positive reviews in the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Boston Globe, Minneapolis Star-Tribune, the science journal, Nature and elsewhere. It was excerpted in The Washington Post, the San Jose Mercury and other outlets.
It received national attention that summer when President Clinton told the press he was reading The Heat Is On.

Since the book's publication, Gelbspan has appeared in numerous radio and television interviews, including “Nightline,” “All Things Considered” and “Talk of the Nation.” He was invited to the World Economic Forum in Switzerland in February, 1998, where he addressed government ministers and leaders of multi-national corporations.

In 2004, Gelbspan published Boiling Point: How Politicians, Big Oil and Coal, Journalists, and Activists are Fueling the Climate Crisis – and What We Can Do to Avert Disaster (Basic Book). The book received the lead review, written by Al Gore, in the Sunday New York Times Book Review that August.

Gelbspan has written on issues related to the climate in, among other outlets, “The Atlantic Monthly,” “Harper's,” “the Nation,” “The American Prospect,” “Mother Jones” and “Sierra Magazine,” among others, as well as op-ed articles in The Baltimore Sun, the Boston Globe, the Christian Science Monitor and numerous other newspapers.

In the summer of 1998, he and Dr. Paul Epstein, associate director of the Center for Health and the Global Environment of Harvard Medical School, assembled a group of economists, energy company presidents and policy specialists to hammer out a set of strategies designed to dramatically accelerate the Kyoto process. They were invited to present those strategies at a conference in Buenos Aires in 1998. As a result of that presentation, the United Nations Development Programme invited them to mount a conference on those strategies in Bonn, Germany in June, 1999, during that round of climate negotiations.

The “strategies” have been endorsed by a number of large NGOs in India, Mexico, Germany, Bangladesh and elsewhere – as well as by a number of economists, energy specialists and environmentalists both in the U.S. and abroad. Most recently, the were endorsed by Margot Wallstrom, former Environmental Commissioner of the European Union, and Sir Crispin Tickell, former British Ambassador to the United Nations.

He presented these “solution” strategies in May, 2000, at a conference he keynoted in Cairo. (The conference was co-sponsored by UNEP and CEDARE, the Center for Environment and Development in the Arab Region and Europe). While in Cairo, he briefed directors and managers of Shell/Egypt.

In September, 2000, Gelbspan presented these strategies to a small group of Senators and Congressmen at a meeting in Washington. These strategies were received enthusiastically by a number of delegates and NGOs from the G-77 at the recent round of climate talks in The Hague, where they were disseminated by Anil Agarwal, head of the Centre for Science and Environment in New Delhi and a leader of the NGO community of the G-77.

In December, 2000, these strategies were presented to a new G-8 Task Force on Renewable Energy headed by Sir Mark Moody-Stuart, director of Shell, as well as a managing director of the World Bank. Sir Mark intends to put these ideas in front of the full task force.

Over the course of his career, Gelbspan worked at The Philadelphia Bulletin, The Washington Post, the Village Voice, Scripps Howard, where he was a national news editor, and The Boston Globe. He has also taught at the Columbia University School of Journalism.

In 1971, he spent a month in the Soviet Union interviewing Soviet dissidents and human rights advocates. His four-part series on the Soviet underground was reprinted in the Congressional Record. In 1974, he edited a book for Scripps-Howard on the Congressional Watergate Committee hearings.

In 1979, the Boston Globe hired Gelbspan as a senior editor. In his capacity as special projects editor, he conceived, directed and edited a series of articles on job discrimination against African-Americans in Boston-area corporations, universities, unions, newspapers and state and city government. The series won a Pulitzer Prize in 1984.

In 1991 he published an investigative book about FBI abuses during the 1980s. The book exposed the domestic aspect of the Iran-Contra scandal, documented a secret relationship between the FBI and the National Guard of El Salvador and detailed a campaign of surveillance, harassment and break-ins which led to the entry of the names of 100,000 political and religious activists in the FBI’ss terrorism files. That same year, he wrote a series of articles which contributed to the closing down of an aging, unsafe nuclear power plant in Western Massachusetts.

Gelbspan received his B.A. at Kenyon College and did post-graduate study at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies in Washington, D.C.

He is 65, married to Anne Gelbspan, a non-profit developer of housing for low-income families, and the father of two daughters, Thea, 30, and Johanna, 28, and lives in Brookline, MA.

Researcher Slams Skeptics' Distortions in New York Times Op-Ed

“Our results have been misused as 'evidence' against global warming by Michael Crichton … and by Ann Coulter… In the meantime, I would like to remove my name from the list of scientists who dispute global warming. I know my coauthors would as well.” – Peter Doran, Op-Ed Page, New York Times, July 27, 2006

Energy-Funded Pol Launches Yet Another Congressional Mannhunt

Rep. Ed Whitfield, a Republican congressman from Kentucky (and a darling of the coal, gas, oil, auto and railroad industries), will be holding yet another set of hearings on the famous “hockey stick” climate reconstruction graph by Drs. Michael Mann, Raymond Bradley and Malcolm Hughes.  Mann indicated he will testify – even though his graph has become a lightning rod for climate-change deniers.

(They deniers seem oblivious to the fact that Mann's work has been thoroughly peer-reviewed and approved by a number of studies, most recently by the US  National Research Council.  They also seem not to understand that even if Mann's work were proved to be fatally flawed, it is only the latest of many scientifically approved studies that prove we humans, by our burning of coal and oil, are trashing the planet.)

NASA Turns Its Back on Planet Earth

Nasa has dropped from its mission statement it's charge to “understand and protect our home planet.”  The question is whether its new emphasis on  space exploration means the Bush Administraiton thinks it's already too late to “protect our home planet,” or whether it just thinks colonizing space is more important than keeping Earth habitable for the rest of us. 

White House Environmental Chief Launches Stealth Attack on Climate Science

James Connaughton, head of the White House Environmental Office (CEQ)James Connaughton told Congress:  “There’s a lot of agreement … on warming…We begin to get into issues [of disagreement] about the extent to which humans are a problem.”

Here Comes the Sun -- Yet Again!

It's all due to the sun – according to a guest column in the Ft. Wayne News Sentinel.  Unfortunately, none but a few contrarian scientists – many paid by coal and oil interests – believe that.

Virtually all legitimate climate scientists conclude that while the sun was the dominant external influence on the climate until about 150 years ago, it has since been swamped by greenhouse gases which, today, comprise about 85 percent of the external influences on the climate.

Dear Sun-Sentinal Editor

To the Editor:

On July 18, Charles Lehman wrote to the Sun-Sentinel downplaying the reality of human-induced global warming. His letter contains several critical misunderstandings.

Lindzen Keeps It Complicated -- And The Wall Street Journal Laps It Up!

Dr. Richard LindzenThe editorial page editors of the Wall Street Journal have a love affair with longtime skeptic Richard Lindzen. It's easy to see why.  Wind him up and he says the same thing – only with more obscurity and complexity than the previous time around.  If you're up to it, read Lindzen's latest in the WSJ.   Then consider just one inconvenient example from his writing.

Editor Dissects Skeptical Attack on AP Survey of Scientists' Views of Gore Film

When the Associated Press released its survey of climate scientists—virtually all of whom said “An Inconvenient Truth” faithfully portrayed climate science—an aide to skeptical Sen. James Inhofe (R-OK) released a press release headlined “AP Incorrectly Claims Scientists Praise Gore's Movie.”  Jim Motavalli—editor of “E/the Environmental Magazine”—dug into this exercise in disinformation to sort it all out. 

Carbon Sequestration: An Idea Whose Time Has Gone?

Ooops. Turns out that burying CO2 from power plants may not be such a good idea after all. Apparently the stuff turns into a nasty chemical mix that erodes the ability of sandstone to keep the stuff underground! 

Skeptics Blame it All On The Pols! More than 2,000 Scientists Must Feel Slighted!

Strange how Al Gore and Bill Clinton are blamed for scientific forecasts.  The skeptics have to twist themselves out of shape to ignore the findings of more than 2,000 scientists from 100 countries who have agreed since 1995 that weather extremes are the first marker of early-stage global warming!

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