Utz Tillmann

Utz Tillmann

 Credentials

  • PhD, Biology. [1]

 Background

Dr. Utz Tillmann is the General Manager/CEO of the Union of Chemical Industries, or the Verband der Chemischen Industrie (VCI) in Germany. He was appointed as chief executive on June 1, 2008. [2]

Tillmann's background is in biology where he achieved his degrees and a PhD. He began his professional career in 1985 as the head of the laboratory at the Institute for Heavy Ion Research in Düsseldorf and as a research assistant at the Technical University of Darmstadt.

He later moved to BASF in Ludwigshafen, the largest chemical company in Europe. From January 2001 to March 2004, he was seconded for three years to Cefic (the European Chemical Industry Council) as Executive Director of their Environmental Policy Department. When he returned to his company, he became Senior Vice President until 2006. He was in charge of public affairs concerning the environment.

From September 2006 to April 2008, he was responsible for global security and defense policies, then moved to VCI in May, 2008. [1]

Stance on Climate Change

Tillman appears to recognize that climate change is an issue, although he also points to the benefits of the chemical industry in climate protection: “We have reduced our own emissions by nearly half since 1990. Many of our products are also indispensable for effective climate protection,” he said in a VCI press release. [3]

Key Quotes

“[T]he issue of climate change for the Germans have lost none of its relevance. This gives our long-standing demand for an effective global climate agreement emphasizes once. The policy must be the World Climate Summit in Durban to use the playing field and increase the participation of developing countries.” [3]

Key Deeds

November/December, 2012

Utz Tillmann was a speaker (PDF) at the Eighth International Conference on Climate Change (ICCC-8)/Fifth International Conference on Climate and Energy (ICCE-5) sponsored by both the Heartland Institute and the European Institute for Climate and Energy (EIKE). Tillmann's speech covers “The implications of Germany’s new Energy Concept for Germany’s Industry.” [4]

January, 2012

Utz Tillmann argues that there is no economical replacement for crude oil as a raw material for the chemical industry. He was responding to an idea put forward by Uwe Lahl, a consultant on environmental technology, who proposed that the chemical industry could use renewable materials to reduce its consumption of fossil fuel energy and raw materials. [5]

 Affiliations

 Publications

Utz Tillmann appears to have written a number of articles on economics. A sample is available here. He does not appear to have published peer-reviewed articles on any other subject. 

 Resources

  1. “Utz Tillmann,” Cefic (The European Chemical Industry Council). Accessed November, 2012.

  2. chief executive Utz Tillmann,” Franffurter Allgemeine, June 3, 2008.

  3. Almost all Germans hold important for climate protection” (Press Release),  ChemiVerbande, November 24, 2011. Translated with Google.

  4. “8th International Conference on Climate Change (ICCC-8): V International Conference on Climate and Energy (ICCE-5). Hotel Bayerischer Hof, Munich, November 30 – December 1, 2012” (PDF) retrieved from eike-klima-energy.eu on November, 2012.

  5. Study appeals to chemical industry to use alternatives to oil,” DW.DE, November 25, 2012.

  6. Without cost brake fails, the energy revolution” (Press Release), VCI, July 28, 2012.

  7. Management,” VCI. Accessed November, 2012.

  8. The National Associations Board,” Cefic. Accessed November, 2012.

  9. Dr. Utz Tillmann,” Zoominfo, December 15, 2012.

  10. No thanks, we're European,” The Economist, November 24, 2005.

    Image credit: VCI / Fuest

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High-speed train

Aggressively tackling global warming through better public transportation and increased energy efficiencies could increase global GDP by between $1.8 trillion and $2.6 trillion annually, a new report has found.

Released on Monday, the report by the World Bank and the ClimateWorks Foundation said tackling global warming now would also save as many as 94,000 lives a year from pollution-related diseases and reduce crop losses.

The report —...

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