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Have Oil Majors Changed Their Tune on Climate Change?

Oil rig by wind turbines

This is the biggest challenge as we have at the moment as a company,” Ben van Beurden, chief executive of oil giant Shell, said recently. “The fact that societal acceptance of the energy system as we have it is just disappearing.”

Speaking at the annual CERAWeek energy conference in Houston on March 9, van Beurden described the growing tensions between his industry, which has created our fossil fuel dependent energy system, and the public, which is demanding a switch to clean energy: “I do think trust has been eroded to the point where it starts to become a serious issue for our long-term future.”

The world’s largest oil companies are increasingly faced with public pressure to do something about their impact on climate change. And increasingly we’re seeing their chief executives responding. The question is though, how much is for real and what's just greenwash?

Revealed: How BP Puts its Branding in Local Schools While Cutting North Sea Jobs

Key documents on the BP sponsored student tutoring scheme in Aberdeenshire

Oil giant BP is promoting its brand to thousands of schoolchildren in almost 100 schools in Aberdeenshire, an area in which it recently slashed a fifth of its workforce.

Documents obtained by DeSmog UK through freedom of information requests show BP sponsoring a tutoring scheme and cooperating with the local council and universities to place its branding in schools.

DeSmog UK’s investigation shows:

  • BP’s branding has been present in primary and secondary schools in Aberdeenshire, with students aged five to 16 years old.
  • Some participating schools and tutors are unconvinced of the scheme’s benefits.
  • BP pays only £2,000 a year to get its branding in front of thousands of students, despite posting profits of almost $3 billion in 2016.
  • BP is closely involved in the design and implementation of the scheme as a member of the controlling steering committee.
  • BP retained control over some of the scheme’s output, and sought to use the resources of publicly funded co-sponsors to promote the company’s involvement.

Meet the Fossil Fuel Lobbyists and Climate Science Deniers at the Marrakech COP22 Talks

Corporate sponsors at the COP22 climate talks in Marrakech

It’s no secret fossil fuel companies will have to fundamentally change their business models if countries are serious about tackling climate change.

With so much skin in the game, it’s no surprise they find ways to try and influence climate policy at the highest level.

The international climate talks in Marrakech this week has provided the perfect opportunity for corporate lobbyists and climate science deniers to push their high carbon agendas.

Big Oil Called out for Greenwashing, Issues Essentially the Same Pre-COP Climate Pledge as Last Year

pipelines

Big oil today outlined how it plans to do its bit to help curb warming to two degrees. The announcement comes on the same day the Paris Agreement formally comes into force.

Predictably, there remains a considerable gap between the companies’ commitments and the Paris Agreement’s goals.

Analysts say that to curb warming to two degrees, companies will have to leave around a third of oil reserves in the ground. So is that the revolutionary decision the companies today announced?

Exxon, BP, Chevron CEOs Descend on London to Talk Money, Ignore Climate

Intercontinental park lane

Big Oil is coming to town, and it's here for one thing: to talk money.

As the industry continues to suffer what Forbes describes as the “worst oil crash in a generation”, execs need to work out new ways to turn a profit, and fast.

On Tuesday and Wednesday, hundreds of industry executives will gather in London at the InterContinental Park Lane Hotel for the Oil and Money conference, with sponsors including ExxonMobil, BP, Shell, Chevron, Total and Saudi Aramco.

The annual shindig pitches itself as “the energy industry's premier conference”, and attracts top officials from the world’s biggest companies.

Could the International Criminal Court Start Prosecuting Climate Crimes?

International Criminal Court

The International Criminal Court at The Hague (ICC) has released a new set of proposed rule changes that could open the door to prosecuting individuals, governments, and perhaps even corporations for environmental crimes against humanity, such as oil spills, deforestation, and excessive carbon emissions.

Security Firm Guarding Dakota Access Pipeline Also Used Psychological Warfare Tactics for BP

Standing Rock Security

G4S, a company hiring security staff to guard the hotly contested Dakota Access pipeline (DAPL), also works to guard oil and gas industry assets in war-torn Iraq, and has come under fire by the United Nations for human rights abuses allegedly committed while overseeing a BP pipeline in Colombia and elsewhere while on other assignments.

Recently, the UK-based G4S placed job advertisements on its website, announcing it would be hiring security teams to work out of offices in Mandan and Bismarck, North Dakota. These two locales are only a 45-minute drive away from the ongoing Standing Rock Sioux Tribe-led encampment unfolding along DAPL's route in Cannon Ball, North Dakota. First among the list of required experience for both locations is service related to military police, elite military forces, or “any support role in a combat zone.” 

BP Announces Final Estimate Of Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill, But Are They Being Honest?

Julie Dermansky

On July 14th, oil giant BP announced that they had finally finished their calculations and the final estimate for costs of the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill would likely hit $62 billion. This cost includes all of the settlements and lawsuits from individuals, lawsuits from cities and states, federal lawsuits, and civil penalties and cleanup costs.

According to reports, the “after tax” total is closer to $44 billion, still a massive sum to pay out for any company.

Nearly every article available discussing these payments deals with the business impacts and market value of the company. The Washington Post says that the company has lost 1/3 of their market size as a result of the spill, which was about $180 billion before the disaster.

Lip service is paid to the victims of the spill and the long-lasting effects that the disaster had on the Gulf of Mexico, and one vital fact has been missing completely from the analysis: Taxpayers are the ones who are really getting screwed with this deal.

Revealed: The Brussels Breakfast Lobby Group Exxon and BP Don’t Want You To Know They’re Part Of

Few people will have heard of AMISA2. And if you have, it's probably only because you're part of it.

The shadowy and little-known Brussels organisation doesn’t even have a website, yet it boasts the likes of Airbus, Google and Michelin as members.  Most corporations paying annual fees don’t declare they take part in the monthly “breakfast debates” that AMISA2 organises.

For 20 years the organisation has led a quiet existence, offering its select group of 18 corporate members direct access to EU decision-makers.

Among them are oil giants ExxonMobil, BP, and Total according to a June 2016 members list provided to DeSmog UK by AMISA2 president Georg Brodach.

Oil Majors Told to Adapt or Die

As profits and prices plummet, the oil conglomerates – some of the world’s biggest companies – have been warned they must change their ways or face extinction, writes Kieran Cooke at Climate News Network.

At best, big oil companies such as ExxonMobil, Shell, Chevron and BP face a period of gentle decline, but will ultimately survive.

At worst, if they do not adapt and change direction, “what remains of their existence will be nasty, brutish and short”.

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