hurricanes and global warming

As Aerial Footage of Devastated Bahamas Emerges, Campaigners Ask How Much Destruction and Death Before Global Climate Action Taken?

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Hurricane Dorian destruction

Jessica Corbett, Common Dreams. Originally published on Common Dreams under CC BY-SA 3.0 US.

As the National Hurricane Center announced Tuesday that Hurricane Dorian's core was “finally moving away from Grand Bahama Island,” toward the Southeastern U.S. coast, footage of the storm's devastation flooded the internet alongside calls for governments and the news media to recognize the here-and-now destruction of the climate emergency.

Hurricanes to Deliver a Bigger Punch to Coasts

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Mozambique flooded coast after Cyclone Idai

By Ryan P. Mulligan, Queen's University, Ontario

When tropical cyclone Idai made landfall near Beira, Mozambique on March 14, a spokesperson for the UN World Meteorological Organization called it possibly the worst weather-related disaster to hit the southern hemisphere.

This massive and horrifying storm caused catastrophic flooding and widespread destruction of buildings and roads in Mozambique, Zimbabwe and Malawi. Mozambique’s President Filipe Nyusi feared the death toll might rise to more than 1,000 people.

Cyclones, also known as hurricanes or typhoons, are intense wind storms that can take thousands of lives and cause billions of dollars in damage. They generate large ocean waves and raise water levels by creating a storm surge. The combined effects cause coastal erosion, flooding and damage to anything in its path.

On Hurricanes and Global Warming, Don't "Cool It" Too Much

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Chris Mooney's weekly DeSmogBlog dispatch.

The Danish environmental apostate Bjorn Lomborg is at it again.

Lomborg has a new book out, and just like his last one (The Skeptical Environmentalist), it's drawing strong criticism. Lomborg's argument isn't that global warming is a hoax–thank goodness, we're mostly past that. Instead, he merely argues that climate change is not as big a deal as some think (e.g., Al Gore)–and further, that it doesn't make good economic sense to take dramatic steps to address the problem by imposing mandatory emissions caps.

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