Saturday, April 20, 2019 - 03:04 • Julie Dermansky

Albert Naquin, Chief of the Isle de Jean Charles Biloxi-Chitimacha-Choctaw Tribe (IDJC), often loses sleep over his tribe’s fate as its historic island homeland continues to lose land at an alarming rate. His dream to relocate the tribe from Isle de Jean Charles with a federal grant has turned into a nightmare.

After helping the Louisiana Office of Community Development (OCD) win a $98 million grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), the Tribe no longer wants to be associated with the State’s project, which included $48 million earmarked to relocate the IDJC Tribe. 

Saturday, April 13, 2019 - 05:10 • Guest
Read time: 4 mins

This is a guest post by ClimateDenierRoundup.

On Wednesday, the Daily Caller published an opinion piece by Heartland Institute policy analyst Timothy Benson that we can only assume is satire. Benson argues in the piece that when it comes to addressing the existential threat of climate change, “if we can’t persuade” the current-top-emitters of China, Russia and India to cut their emissions, then the U.S. “will have to invade and occupy these countries” and force the emission reductions.

Friday, April 12, 2019 - 13:01 • Sharon Kelly
Read time: 8 mins

This week, at an industry conference focused on wooing petrochemical producers to West Virginia, officials from the state and federal government made clear their support for continuing fracked shale gas extraction and petrochemical industry development near the natural gas-rich Marcellus Shale.

Why should petrochemical companies build in West Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Ohio? For one thing, don’t expect regulation of shale gas drilling, Michael Graney, executive director of the West Virginia Development Office, predicted in his presentation.

Thursday, April 11, 2019 - 14:44 • Guest
Read time: 4 mins

By Olivia Rosane, EcoWatch. Reposted with permission from EcoWatch.

More than 4,500 Amazon employees have signed a letter calling on the company to take concrete action on climate change, with demands including a complete transition away from fossil fuels.

The letter was posted on Medium Wednesday by a group calling itself Amazon Employees for Climate Justice and was addressed to CEO Jeff Bezos and the Amazon Board of Directors. The group called on the company to release an action plan on climate change based on the principles outlined in their letter.

Wednesday, April 10, 2019 - 13:27 • Justin Mikulka
Read time: 6 mins

Congressional discussions over climate change have reached such a low point that during this week’s House hearing on the national security risks of climate change, former Secretary of State John Kerry, who was testifying, broke down and just asked his Republican questioner, “Are you serious?”

Wednesday, April 10, 2019 - 04:01 • Mat Hope
Read time: 17 mins

Police have been criticised for repeatedly delaying a review of official guidance for policing fracking protests after a cache of leaked correspondence highlighted ongoing problems with the consultation process. More than two years after the review was first promised, DeSmog and the Guardian can exclusively reveal it has now been delayed for a fifth time.

Dozens of leaked emails between the National Police Chiefs Council (NPCC) Lead on Shale Gas and Oil Exploration — Lancashire Assistant Chief Constable Terry Woods — and Green MEP Keith Taylor show how the process has been repeatedly delayed, with the review’s remit changing without any prior warning.

Monday, April 8, 2019 - 13:50 • Guest
Read time: 4 mins

By Jon Queally, Common Dreams. Originally posted on Common Dreams.

A new research paper by American and European climate scientists focused on Arctic warming published Monday reveals that the “smoking gun” when it comes to changes in the world's northern polar region is rapidly warming air temperatures that are having — and will continue to have — massive and negative impacts across the globe.

Monday, April 8, 2019 - 05:38 • Guest
Read time: 4 mins

British video activist Shaun Dey was one of two members of Reel News who went to North America last year to make films about grassroots struggles around climate change, particularly around the ideas of “just transition” and “just recovery”. He reflects on his experience of travelling the region for 14 weeks.

When Trump got into power, we immediately wanted to get over to the States and see what was happening. We knew there were a lot of grassroots movements in the States coming together around climate change, and that refreshingly it was a movement led by working-class communities of colour.

What were all those activists doing now that a climate science denier was President?

Sunday, April 7, 2019 - 05:02 • Guest
Read time: 6 mins

By Robert Kopp, Rutgers University

Climate change is a chronic challenge — it is here now, and will be with us throughout this century and beyond. As the U.S. government’s National Climate Assessment report made clear, it’s already affecting people throughout the United States and around the world.

Saturday, April 6, 2019 - 04:27 • Guest
Read time: 4 mins

This is a guest post by ClimateDenierRoundup.

Two great pieces of journalism were published this week we’d like to draw attention to today. While neither were particularly focused on climate change denial, taken together, they provide some helpful insight into denial not only as a state of mind, but as a function of luxury and privilege.

That’s the underlying message of Sarah Miller’s recent piece in Popula. Miller poses as a wealthy married woman interested in purchasing pricey Miami real estate, feigning interest before springing her key question: Is it smart to buy something with a 30-year mortgage in Miami, given the fact that sea level rise is already regularly flooding the city?

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