Sunday, September 24, 2017 - 06:03 • Simon Davis-Cohen
scrabble tiles spelling out 'vote'

Three years in a row, communities in Ohio have attempted to vote on initiatives that would grant them greater say over oil and gas development in their jurisdictions, but over and over again, appointed officials, some with direct ties to the fossil fuel industry, have put up roadblocks preventing these initiatives from reaching the ballot.

We’re losing our ability to legislate and be a check and balance on the government,” Tish O’Dell of the Ohio Community Rights Network told DeSmog on September 15.

Monday, February 13, 2006 - 16:34 • Ross Gelbspan
From evangelicals to students to business groups, climate change is a rising political concern.
The Christian Science Monitor, Feb. 14, 2006  
Global warming isn’t just a “blue state” issue anymore.

From the Rocky Mountain West to the Southeast, influential red-state voices are beginning to call for more concerted efforts at local, state, and federal levels to curb greenhouse-gas emissions.

Monday, February 13, 2006 - 07:29 • Ross Gelbspan

The Sydney Morning Herald, Feb. 13, 2006  

A former  CSIRO senior scientist and internationally recognised expert on climate change claims he was reprimanded and encouraged to resign after he spoke out on global warming. 

Saturday, February 11, 2006 - 11:34 • Ross Gelbspan

While big coal and big oil have spent millions on disinformation about climate change, the Bush Administration has upped the ante by turning industry-generated denial into a government policy of censorship.

The targets are some of the most respected climate scientists in the U.S.      

Jim Hansen, a NASA researcher who first told the U.S. in 1988 that “global warming is at hand,” complained recently he is being muzzled by officials in his own agency. His sin: suggesting that we need to act quickly to reduce carbon emissions.  As a result, NASA brass ordered the agency's public information staff to review any future statements, including interviews with journalists, by its scientists.

Friday, February 10, 2006 - 08:23 • Ross Gelbspan

Last year, the famous “hockey-stick” graph by researchers Michael Mann, Raymond Bradley and Malcolm Hughes, came under fire when it was deemed inaccurate by two Canadians – Stephen McIntyre, a minerals and oil consultant, and Ross McKitrick, and economist – neither of whom have any background in climate science.

Friday, February 10, 2006 - 06:13 • Richard Littlemore

In a recent and misleading post, the Heartland Institute quoted a report by the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to argue that there is no corelation between recent hurricane activity and climate change.

Thursday, February 9, 2006 - 20:23 • Richard Littlemore

If you wake up and see a reasonable scientific argument, go back in your hole for six weeks …

Actually, this is a bad set-up for a great Molly Ivins column on the Bush Administration’s handling of the climate file. Molly doesn’t quite nominate Punxsutawney Phil for President, but she allows: “At least he doesn’t lie about the weather.” Phil, that is. Not the president …

Thursday, February 9, 2006 - 20:18 • James Hoggan

A nice survey of the “skeptics” attack on climate science - and the public policy implications - can be found on the blog UKWatch.net.


For more on the who's who of the climate denial industry, check out our comprehensive climate deniers research database.

Thursday, February 9, 2006 - 14:33 • Ross Gelbspan

The American Association of Petroleum Geologists is presenting its annual journalism award this year to Michael Crichton, the science fiction writer whose latest book, “State of Fear,” dismisses global warming as a largely imaginary threat embraced by malignant scientists for their own ends.

“It is fiction,” conceded Larry Nation, communications director for the association. “But it has the absolute ring of truth” he told the New York Times.

Tuesday, February 7, 2006 - 08:34 • Ross Gelbspan

Card rapped as stooge: Critics say energy advice is tainted

The Boston Herald, Feb. 7, 2006

Environmentalists yesterday blasted President Bush’s energy budget as the product of an administration dominated by ex-oil and auto industry executives — including former auto lobbyist turned White House chief of staff Andrew Card.

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