Wednesday, September 18, 2019 - 00:01 • Mat Hope

By Mat Hope, DeSmog, and Eduardo Robaina, La Marea/Climática. Lee en español en Climática.

This story is part of Covering Climate Now, a global collaboration of more than 250 news outlets to strengthen coverage of the climate story.  

In December 2015, European Commission President Jean-Claude Junker stood at a podium to hail the world’s first comprehensive agreement to take action on climate change, and told the world, “the Paris Agreement now reflects our ambition worldwide.” While the European Union’s leaders stand by that sentiment, a lot has changed since then.

The Union is facing a credibility crisis, threatened by Brexit and the rise of populism across the continent. Its leadership is facing calls to simultaneously increase its ambition to tackle climate change and cut the very regulations that would deliver reductions in globe-warming pollution.

Climate policy — a seemingly unlikely candidate for controversy back in 2015 — is suddenly at the heart of a European power struggle.

Friday, October 19, 2007 - 11:35 • Kevin Grandia
Read time: 2 mins

In July, I wrote a piece about a major US climate report being stealthily released on a Friday afternoon by the State Department. You can find the report here, it was quite a scathing admission by the US government that very little was being done to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and that they had very little planned to deal with it down the road.

I was not surprised that the report was released on a Friday afternoon, in the dog days of summer, without a mention in the State Department's daily press briefing - it's a common PR tactic when you have to release bad news.

Thursday, October 18, 2007 - 16:25 • Kevin Grandia
Read time: 1 min

Have you seen Zaproot TV before? This is a great new web-based hyper-fast TV show summing up the latest environment news.

Why are we fans?

Well, first off they gave DeSmogBlog a plug this week and, well, the host, Jessica Williamson is fabulous, funny and, well, just watch:



Online Videos by Veoh.com
Thursday, October 18, 2007 - 15:55 • Ross Gelbspan
Read time: 1 min

U.S. House Committee on Science and Technology Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight Chairman Brad Miller (D-NC) has sent a letter (pdf) to the ExxonMobil Corporation requesting all records since 2002 related to their support for scientists working on polar bears and other Arctic animals.

This request comes in the wake of an “opinion” piece appearing in the journal Ecological Complexity by seven scientists claiming that there is no evidence of decline in the polar bear population of West Hudson Bay as a result of global warming.

Wednesday, October 17, 2007 - 16:00 • Bill McKibben
Read time: 2 mins
Probably readers will recall the Step It Up rallies that we organized in the spring–1,400 protests in each of the 50 states that helped make calls for 80% cuts in carbon emissions a standard part of the global warming debate.
 
We're at it again–on Nov. 3 we're holding demonstrations all across the country (well, except in North Dakota, at least so far).
 
This time we're trying to cut the number down a little bit (last time we had a bit of the cannibalization problem that Burger King must encounter when opening new sites) and instead concentrating on getting politicians to actually come address the issue, head-on no excuses, tell us what the hell you're going to do. (You can see the map of all the rallies so far at stepitup07.org, and it's not too late to organize one in your community.)
Wednesday, October 17, 2007 - 15:25 • Richard Littlemore
Read time: 3 mins

The three “world leaders” who are working hardest these days to kill the Kyoto Accord are also asking their public to believe numbers that are, at best, misleading.

U.S. President George Bush, Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper and Australian Prime Minister John Howard lead three of the richest countries in the world and the three leading per capita greenhouse gas emitters among major nations. All three have rejected the Kyoto Accord - or any other fixed and measurable limit on greenhouse gas emissions - preferring “aspirational” targets that are voluntary and keyed off “carbon intensity.” All three are also straining credulity in making their case.
Wednesday, October 17, 2007 - 13:50 • Chris Mooney
Read time: 6 mins
The Paradox of Al Gore When Al Gore won the Nobel Peace prize last Friday–along with the very deserving U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change–the fulminations predictably followed. Previous victims of what Paul Krugman calls “Gore Derangement Syndrome” had new flare-ups of the disease, often in the most embarrassing of places. There was a rash of bad science reporting, suggesting that Gore's An Inconvenient Truth (the film version) is somehow much more inaccurate than it actually is.

And then came the powerful defenses of Gore, the skewerings of the Gore deranged, and just general voicing of reason. Alas, the Gore defenders, while being broadly accurate about Gore's “broadly accurate” film, also seem to have missed some key matters that bear addressing.

So let's add some needed perspective here.

A DeSmogBlog exclusive weekly column by best-selling author and science writer, Chris Mooney.
Wednesday, October 17, 2007 - 11:04 • Richard Littlemore
Read time: 2 mins

The National Post, having humiliated itself on the weekend with an assault on everything from Mother Teresa to UN peacekeeping has offered a Counterpoint today that reads awfully like a mea culpa.

Entitled Hate Al Gore All You Like, Global Warming is Real, the article by CFRB DJ John Moore rips into the Post's anti-Gore screed and especially business editor Terence Corcoran's desperate effort to suggest that the science behind climate change is still somehow uncertain.

Wednesday, October 17, 2007 - 07:12 • Richard Littlemore
Read time: 1 min
The Throne Speech authored by Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper promised yesterday a 20-per-cent reduction in greenhouse gases (GHGs) by 2020. By all the evidence, that was politicalspeak for: We're going to do less and take longer than you could ever have imagined.
Wednesday, October 17, 2007 - 06:10 • Ross Gelbspan
Read time: 1 min

David Suzuki, Canada's best-known environmentalist, has spent a generation encouraging Canadians to look after the environment, but it seems they have not been listening.

While Canada ratified the 1997 Kyoto Protocol on limiting greenhouse gas emissions, the current, Conservative government says the standards cannot be met, reopening a debate he thought had been won.

“We've already been here before, and that's the thing that breaks my heart,” he told Reuters during one of his frequent trips to Toronto from his home in Vancouver. “If we had taken it seriously and done something, we would be so far past the Kyoto target today, and the problems would be infinitely simpler and cheaper.”

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