World Health Organization

Major Health Study Shows Benefits of Combating Climate Change

Read time: 4 mins
Commuters by bike share in New York City

During the holiday season, people often drink toasts to health. There’s something more we can do to ensure that we and others will enjoy good health now and into the future: combat climate change.

Climate change is the biggest global health threat of the 21st century, and tackling it could be our greatest health opportunity,” according to the medical journal The Lancet.

The Lancet Countdown: Tracking Progress on Health and Climate Change, by 150 experts from 27 academic institutions and intergovernmental organizations, including the World Health Organization and the World Bank, is blunt: “A rapidly changing climate has dire implications for every aspect of human life, exposing vulnerable populations to extremes of weather, altering patterns of infectious disease, and compromising food security, safe drinking water and clean air.”

Unsealed Court Documents Suggest Collusion Between Monsanto, EPA to Pollute Science

Read time: 4 mins
Bottles of Roundup herbicide on a store shelf

Agrichemical giant Monsanto is currently facing lawsuits from people who claim that exposure to the company’s blockbuster product Roundup has caused cancer, specifically non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and other cancers of the blood. The active ingredient in Roundup, glyphosate, is the suspected culprit. Roundup is the most widely used herbicide on the planet right now.

As part of this ongoing litigation, Judge Vince Chhabria has unsealed some of the documents that have been filed with the court. These documents appear to show that Monsanto had numerous contacts with regulators at the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) during the time that the agency was supposed to be investigating the link between Roundup and certain cancers.

Prescription for Health: Fight Global Warming

Read time: 4 mins

This is a guest post by David Suzuki

What if we could reduce worldwide deaths from disease, starvation and disaster while improving the health of people everywhere? According to the World Health Organization, we can.

Previously unrecognized health benefits could be realized from fast action to reduce climate change and its consequences,” says a news release about WHO’s first global conference on health and climate in Geneva August 27 to 29, adding, “changes in energy and transport policies could save millions of lives annually from diseases caused by high levels of air pollution.” Encouraging people to use public transit, cycling and walking instead of driving would cut traffic injuries and vehicle emissions and promote better health through increased physical activity.

Reducing the threat of global warming and finding ways to adapt to unavoidable change will also help people around the world “deal with the impact of heat, extreme weather, infectious disease and food insecurity.”

Climate change affects human health in multiple ways. Increased extreme weather causes flooding and droughts, which influences food production, water and sanitation. Pathogens that plague humans, livestock and crops spread more widely. WHO notes that diseases such as cholera, malaria and dengue are especially sensitive to weather and climate changes.

WHO traces rise in malaria cases, other health threats, to global warming

Read time: 1 min

The warming planet is imperiled not only by rapidly changing and often destructive weather patterns, but also increases in disease-producing viruses threatening to humans. As a result, the World Health Organization intends to frame climate change as a public-health issue.

Lindzen Keeps It Complicated -- And The Wall Street Journal Laps It Up!

Read time: 2 mins

Dr. Richard LindzenThe editorial page editors of the Wall Street Journal have a love affair with longtime skeptic Richard Lindzen. It's easy to see why.  Wind him up and he says the same thing – only with more obscurity and complexity than the previous time around.  If you're up to it, read Lindzen's latest in the WSJ.   Then consider just one inconvenient example from his writing.

Subscribe to World Health Organization