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Majority of Americans Know Fossil Fuel Companies Drive Climate Change, Should Pay for Damages

Read time: 3 mins
ExxonKnew protesters

By Karen Savage, Climate Liability News. Originally posted on Climate Liability News.

The majority of Americans say fossil fuel companies should pay for damage caused by climate change, according to a recent poll released by Yale University on Wednesday.

Researchers asked 5,131 Americans how much they think global warming is harming their local communities, who they think should be responsible for paying for the damages, and whether they support lawsuits to hold fossil fuel companies accountable for those costs.

Cognitive Dissonance: Canada Declares a National Climate Emergency and Approves a Pipeline

Read time: 5 mins
Trudeau protesters in Vancouver

By Warren Mabee, Queen's University, Ontario

On June 18, the government of Canada declared a national climate emergency. The next day, the same government approved the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion (TMX), which will be able to move almost 600,000 barrels of oil per day from Alberta to the Port of Burnaby in British Columbia.

If this seems like a contradiction, you are not alone.

Thousands of Fossil Fuel 'Observers' Attended Climate Negotiations: UNFCCC Data 2005-2018 for COP1-COP24

Read time: 12 mins
IETA exhibit at COP24

Originally posted on Climate Investigations Center.

The collection of Global Climate Coalition (GCC) documents we compiled and released this April reveal that the organization had a singular focus, slowing down or derailing the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) negotiations process and “tracking” the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), undermining the scientists’ message of urgency.  In the GCC meeting minutes and press releases we see numerous interventions at the UN meetings along with strategies, budgets and debriefs.

So we decided it would be interesting to compile every fossil fuel company and trade group delegate who ever attended UNFCCC meetings. This research debuted in an Agence-France Press AFP piece and on Yahoo News this week during a UNFCCC meeting in Bonn, Germany.

Trump’s EPA Signs 'Deadly' Clean Power Plan Replacement

Read time: 5 mins
Andrew Wheeler and Scott Pruitt

By Olivia Rosane, EcoWatch. Reposted with permission from EcoWatch.

Former coal lobbyist and Trump-appointed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Andrew Wheeler signed a rule Wednesday that officially replaces the Obama-era Clean Power Planwith a new regulation that Wheeler said could lead to the opening of more coal plants, the Associated Press reported.

Trudeau Approval of Tar Sands Pipeline, Say Critics, Would Make 'Absolute Mockery' of Climate Emergency Declaration Approved Less Than 24 Hours Ago

Read time: 3 mins
Justin Trudeau waves

By Jake Johnson, Common Dreams. Originally posted on Common DreamsCC BY-SA 3.0

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on Tuesday is reportedly expected to approve a $5.5 billion expansion of the Trans Mountain tar sands pipeline, a move environmentalists warned would make an “absolute mockery” of the House of Commons' vote to declare a climate emergency just hours earlier.

The Defense Department Is Worried About Climate Change — and Also a Huge Carbon Emitter

Read time: 5 mins
Main image: A U.S. Navy F/A-18 Hornet launching from the USS Theodore Roosevelt on full afterburner.

By Neta C. Crawford, Boston University

Scientists and security analysts have warned for more than a decade that global warming is a potential national security concern.

They project that the consequences of global warming — rising seas, powerful storms, famine and diminished access to fresh water — may make regions of the world politically unstable and prompt mass migration and refugee crises.

Some worry that wars may follow.

Yet with few exceptions, the U.S. military’s significant contribution to climate change has received little attention. Although the Defense Department has significantly reduced its fossil fuel consumption since the early 2000s, it remains the world’s single largest consumer of oil — and as a result, one of the world’s top greenhouse gas emitters.

US Renewable Energy Capacity Beats Coal for the First Time

Read time: 3 mins
Newport Renewables installs solar panels on the Powers Building in the Rhode Island Capitol Hill complex on June 12, 2017

By Jordan Davidson, EcoWatch. Reposted with permission from EcoWatch.

What's the future of coal? The answer may be blowing in the wind. Or running through our waters. Or, maybe it's at the end of a sunbeam.

Wherever the answer is found, the message is clear. Coal is on a downward trend in the U.S. and renewables are on the rise, according to a new report released by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, or FERC.

The report shows that renewable energies had slightly more installed capacity than coal, as CNN reported.

Justice Through Citizen Science: How ‘Chemical Fingerprinting’ Could Change Public Health

Read time: 8 mins
Testing soil sample in the lab

By Erica Cirino. Originally posted on The RevelatorCC BY-NC-SA 3.0

The technology exists to hold polluters accountable, but can it now be used to help monitor pollution and prevent toxic messes?

In the early 2000s, residents of a small, Rust Belt city called Tonawanda, New York, began noticing something strange: Over the years, it seemed, an increasing number of people were getting sick — primarily with cancer.

Tonawanda’s a highly industrial city with more than 50 polluting facilities situated within a three-mile radius. It was common for the air to feel dense and to smell like gasoline. Residents wondered what toxic chemicals might be in the air and if they were making them sick.

'This Is What Fascists Do': Trump Attempted to Suppress State Dept Analyst's Testimony on Climate Crisis

Read time: 3 mins
Rod Schoonover

By Julia Conley, Common Dreams. Originally posted on Common DreamsCC BY-SA 3.0.

The Trump administration issued one of its most blatant attacks on climate science this past week when it tried to stop a State Department employee from testifying on the climate crisis, reports showed on Saturday.

As the Washington Post reported, intelligence analyst Rod Schoonover's testimony was submitted to the White House for approval ahead of his planned appearance before the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence. His remarks focused on the national security risks posed by the climate crisis.

A Radical Idea to Get a High-Renewable Electric Grid: Build Way More Solar and Wind Than Needed

Read time: 7 mins
solar power in desert

By Richard Perez, University at Albany, State University of New York and Karl R. Rabago, Pace University

The famous inventor Edwin Land said, “It’s not that we need new ideas, but we need to stop having old ideas.” He seemed to be telling us that solutions lie just beyond our old habits of thinking.

Cities, states and countries around the world are committing to clean energy economies that run on very high levels — even 100 percent — of renewable energy. In New York state alone, four competing bills target 50 percent to 100 percent renewables by or before 2040.

Realistically, only two renewable energy resources are large enough to meet these very high-penetration objectives on the supply side in the U.S. — solar (by far) and wind.

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