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Blog entry30 Years Ago Global Warming Became Front-Page News – and Both Republicans and Democrats Took It Seriously Guest014 hours 6 min ago
Blog entrySea Level Rise Could Put 2.4 Million US Coastal Homes at Risk Guest01 day 17 hours ago
Blog entryIn-depth: BP’s Global Data for 2017 Shows Record Highs for Coal and Renewables Guest04 days 14 hours ago
Blog entryPennsylvania Regulators OK Leaky 80-year-old Mariner East 1 Pipeline, Set Conditions for Restart of Mariner East 2 Guest04 days 19 hours ago
Blog entrySick as a Dog: Fracking Protests and the Media Blame Game Guest06 days 23 hours ago
Blog entryEPA Staff Say the Trump Administration Is Changing Their Mission From Protecting Human Health and the Environment to Protecting Industry Guest01 week 2 days ago
Blog entryIs the Trans Mountain Pipeline (and Other Fossil Fuel Investments) a Future Stranded Asset? Guest01 week 3 days ago
Blog entryTrump Skipping G7 Meeting on Climate, Clean Energy, Oceans Guest01 week 4 days ago
Blog entryHere’s Why Trump’s New Strategy to Keep Ailing Coal and Nuclear Plants Open Makes No Sense Guest01 week 5 days ago
Blog entryMany Republican Mayors Are Advancing Climate-Friendly Policies Without Saying so Guest02 weeks 16 hours ago
Blog entryTrump Has Damaged the Paris Agreement, Say its Architects Guest02 weeks 2 days ago
Blog entryWill Washington Post's Hiring of Former WSJ Opinion Editor Bring Climate Deniers to its Pages? Guest02 weeks 5 days ago
Blog entryJustin Trudeau's Risky Gamble on the Trans Mountain Pipeline Guest02 weeks 6 days ago
Blog entryWhat's Wrong With Secret Donor Agreements Like the Ones George Mason University Inked with the Kochs Guest03 weeks 2 days ago
Blog entry10 Families Bring First Ever 'People’s Climate Case' Against the EU Guest03 weeks 3 days ago
Blog entryIndulge Them on Conspiracy Theories, And Deniers Might Just Warm to Climate Consensus Guest03 weeks 4 days ago
Blog entryShareholders Force Big Oil to Acknowledge Climate Risk — But Are Still Waiting for Action Guest03 weeks 4 days ago
Blog entryHow to Use Brexit to Stop Companies Suing Governments and Lowering Environmental Standards Guest03 weeks 5 days ago
Blog entryAtlantic Coast Pipeline to Sideline 100 Miles of Construction in Virginia and West Virginia Guest03 weeks 5 days ago
Blog entryHere's What's in the Government's New Air Pollution Plan Guest04 weeks 2 hours ago
Blog entryHow Enbridge Helped Write Minnesota Pipeline Laws Aiding its Line 3 Battle Today Guest04 weeks 14 hours ago
Blog entryScott Pruitt's Approach to Pollution Control Will Make the Air Dirtier and Americans Less Healthy Guest01 month 2 days ago
Blog entryFears UK Could 'Cheat' as Climate Change Excluded from Brexit Watchdog Remit Guest01 month 3 days ago
Blog entryPR Company Tries to Hide Links to New Pro-Fossil Fuel Investment Group Guest01 month 6 days ago
Blog entryAt UN Talks, Rich World Faces Questions on Who Will Replace US Climate Cash Guest01 month 1 week ago

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30 Years Ago Global Warming Became Front-Page News – and Both Republicans and Democrats Took It Seriously

Read time: 8 mins
James Hansen in 1988

By Robert Brulle, Drexel University

June 23, 1988 marked the date on which climate change became a national issue.

In landmark testimony before the U.S. Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, Dr. James Hansen, then director of NASA’s Institute for Space Studies, stated that “Global warming has reached a level such that we can ascribe with a high degree of confidence a cause-and-effect relationship between the greenhouse effect and observed warming … In my opinion, the greenhouse effect has been detected, and it is changing our climate now.”

Sea Level Rise Could Put 2.4 Million US Coastal Homes at Risk

Read time: 3 mins
Sunny day flooding in Miami, Florida

By Olivia Rosane, EcoWatch. Crossposted with permission from EcoWatch.

More than 300,000 U.S. coastal homes could be uninhabitable due to sea level rise by 2045 if no meaningful action is taken to combat climate change, a Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) study published Monday found.

The study, Underwater: Rising Seas, Chronic Floods and the Implications for U.S. Coastal Real Estate, set out to calculate how many coastal properties in the lower 48 states would suffer from “chronic inundation,” non-storm flooding that occurs 26 times a year or more, under different climate change scenarios.

In-depth: BP’s Global Data for 2017 Shows Record Highs for Coal and Renewables

Read time: 10 mins
Piles of coal and polluted water in India's Meghalaya State

By Simon Evans, Carbon Brief. Originally posted on Carbon BriefCC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Renewable energy grew by the largest amount ever last year, while coal-fired electricity also reached a record high, according to new global data from oil giant BP.

However, set against continued rapid rises in energy demand fuelled by oil and gas, renewables were not enough to prevent global CO2 emissions rising significantly for the first time in four years, the figures show.

Pennsylvania Regulators OK Leaky 80-year-old Mariner East 1 Pipeline, Set Conditions for Restart of Mariner East 2

Read time: 7 mins
Map of Mariner East 2 pipeline system across Pennsylvania

By Dan Zegart, crossposted from Climate Investigations Center

In a split decision Thursday, Pennsylvania state regulators allowed the aging Mariner East 1 (ME1) pipeline to resume transporting highly explosive natural gas liquids (NGL), but continued an emergency shut-down of work on a section of a second NGL pipeline, the almost-complete Mariner East 2 (ME2).

Sick as a Dog: Fracking Protests and the Media Blame Game

Read time: 5 mins

By Andy Rowell, Open Democracy UK

North Yorkshire Police are coming under renewed pressure to answer questions over the apparently hasty, heavy-handed and heavily publicised arrest of two campaigners in January this year at the height of the protests against fracking firm Third Energy.

As the protests reached a peak at Kirby Misperton in North Yorkshire, many people believed that fracking could be approved by the Government any day. To add to the heightened tensions, North Yorkshire Police issued a news article which stated that two men had been arrested on suspicion of poisoning a guard dog – potentially with “pellets” made from aniseed balls. The media were quick to pick up the press release leading to stories in the BBC, ITV; Daily Mail as well as local press outlets.

The media was quick to point the finger of blame at the anti-fracking campaigners: “Two men arrested on suspicion of poisoning a fracking site guard dog were environmental protesters”, revealed the Mail Online.

EPA Staff Say the Trump Administration Is Changing Their Mission From Protecting Human Health and the Environment to Protecting Industry

Read time: 7 mins
Protesters at a rally against the current state of the EPA

By Chris Sellers, Stony Brook University (The State University of New York); Lindsey Dillon, University of California, Santa Cruz, and Phil Brown, Northeastern University

The Environmental Protection Agency made news recently for excluding reporters from a “summit” meeting on chemical contamination in drinking water. Episodes like this are symptoms of a larger problem: an ongoing, broad-scale takeover of the agency by industries it regulates.

Is the Trans Mountain Pipeline (and Other Fossil Fuel Investments) a Future Stranded Asset?

Read time: 5 mins
Dakota Access pipeline under construction

By Martin Bush. Reposted with permission from ClimateZone.org

Several major economies, including the U.S. and Canada, rely heavily on fossil fuel production and exports. But the surging market penetration of renewable energy technologies, energy efficiency improvements, and climate emission policies are certain to substantially reduce the global demand for fossil fuels.

In a seminal paper published a week ago in Nature Climate Change, researchers present the results of sophisticated multi-dimensional modeling of the macro-economic impacts of future technology transformations and climate change policy, as the demand for fossil fuels declines and the price of oil falls.

Trump Skipping G7 Meeting on Climate, Clean Energy, Oceans

Read time: 3 mins
Justin Trudeau greets Donald Trump at the G7 meeting

By Lorraine Chow, EcoWatch. Reposted with permission from EcoWatch.

President Donald Trump headed for the Group of Seven (G7) summit in Canada on Friday but will be leaving before Saturday's meeting on climate changeclean energy and oceans. The White House said an aide will take Trump's place, CNN reported.

Here’s Why Trump’s New Strategy to Keep Ailing Coal and Nuclear Plants Open Makes No Sense

Read time: 6 mins
Indian Point nuclear power station in New York

By James Van Nostrand, West Virginia University

President Donald Trump recently ordered Energy Secretary Rick Perry to take “immediate steps” to stop the closure of coal and nuclear power plants.

And according to a draft memo that surfaced the same day, the federal government may establish a “Strategic Electric Generation Reserve” to purchase electricity from coal and nuclear plants for two years.

Both proposals, which have garnered little support, are premised on these power plants being essential to national security. If implemented, the government would be activating emergency powers rarely tapped before for any purpose.

Many Republican Mayors Are Advancing Climate-Friendly Policies Without Saying so

Read time: 6 mins
California Governor Jerry Brown and San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer

By Nicolas Gunkel, Boston University

Leadership in addressing climate change in the United States has shifted away from Washington, D.C. Cities across the country are organizing, networking and sharing resources to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions and tackle related challenges ranging from air pollution to heat island effects.

But group photos at climate change summits typically feature big-city Democratic mayors rubbing shoulders. Republicans are rarer, with a few notable exceptions, such as Kevin Faulconer of San Diego and James Brainard of Carmel, Indiana.

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