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Blog entrySignaling More Independence from the US, the World Bank Phases out its Support for Fossil Fuels Guest04 hours 46 min ago
Blog entryMeet the Money and People Fueling the Contested Bayou Bridge Pipeline Guest02 days 8 hours ago
Blog entry'Clean Energy Is a Fundamental Civil Right': Major Campaign to Expand Access to Solar Guest04 days 18 hours ago
Blog entry2017 Weather and Climate Disasters Cost US Record $306 Billion Guest01 week 1 day ago
Blog entryINEOS Shale to Challenge Scottish Fracking Ban in the Courts – 'Predictable and Desperate' say Opponents Guest01 week 1 day ago
Blog entryTrump's Offshore Oil Drilling Plans Ignore the Lessons of BP Deepwater Horizon Spill Guest01 week 4 days ago
Blog entryPublic Transport Price Hikes Are Costing the Commuter and the Climate Guest01 week 5 days ago
Blog entryCanada's North Needs Many Things, But Oil and Gas Drilling Isn't One of Them Guest02 weeks 11 hours ago
Blog entryWhy Americans Will Never Agree on Oil Drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge Guest02 weeks 4 days ago
Blog entryExxon Mobil’s About-Face on Climate Disclosure Guest02 weeks 5 days ago
Blog entryWho’s Behind A Letter Asking Congress To End The Wind Production Tax Credit? Guest01 month 5 days ago
Blog entryHow Divesting of Fossil Fuels Could Help Save the Planet Guest01 month 6 days ago
Blog entryWhy Al Gore Fears Donald Trump – But Remains Optimistic Guest01 month 1 week ago
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Blog entryHow American Cities and States Are Fighting Climate Change Globally Guest01 month 1 week ago
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Signaling More Independence from the US, the World Bank Phases out its Support for Fossil Fuels

Jim Yong Kim of the World Bank and Emmanual Macron of France

By Elon University

The World Bank, which provides developing countries about US$60 billion a year in financial assistance, is officially phasing out its support for the oil and gas industries.

This move brings its actions more in sync with its overarching commitment to slowing the pace of climate change and keeping the Paris agreement on track. Based on my research regarding international relations, I see this move — which World Bank President Jim Yong Kim announced in December — as significant for two reasons.

Meet the Money and People Fueling the Contested Bayou Bridge Pipeline

Mary Landrieu speaks at the 2008 Democratic National Convention

By Rob Galbraith, Cross-Posted from LittleSis.org

From Dakota Access to Keystone XL to Atlantic Coast, there has been no shortage of controversies over major proposed oil and gas pipelines in recent years. We can add the Bayou Bridge pipeline to this list.

Energy Transfer Partners and Phillips 66’s Bayou Bridge pipeline is a proposed connection to ETP’s Bakken pipeline network that will ship between 280,000 and 480,000 barrels of crude oil per day through southern Louisiana’s bayous and wetlands to petroleum refineries in Lake Charles.

The pipeline is facing committed resistance, both from environmental activists concerned about climate change and the impact of inevitable pipeline leaks and accidents on the environmentally sensitive Atchafalaya Basin, as well as from the communities of people whose homes and ways of life are threatened by the project.

On the other side are the oil and gas corporations that stand to profit from building the pipeline, the banks seeking interest payments on loans to oil and gas companies, and the politicians and academics dependent on oil and gas industry largesse for their careers.

'Clean Energy Is a Fundamental Civil Right': Major Campaign to Expand Access to Solar

Worker installing solar panels

By Lorraine Chow, EcoWatch. Reposted with permission from EcoWatch.

The NAACP is launching a major environmental justice campaign on January 13 to mark the Martin Luther King, Jr. Day of Service.

The “Solar Equity Initiative” aims to provide solar job skills training to 100 individuals, install solar panels on more than 30 homes and community centers in low-income neighborhoods and communities of color, and strengthen equity in solar access policies in at least five states.

2017 Weather and Climate Disasters Cost US Record $306 Billion

LA Firefighting helicopter drops water on a burning home near Burbank, CA in 2017

By Lorraine Chow, EcoWatch. Reposted with permission from EcoWatch.

2017, one of the hottest years in modern history, was also an extremely costly year. According to a new reportfrom the National Centers for Environmental Information, a division of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), “the U.S. experienced 16 weather and climate disasters with losses exceeding $1 billion, with total costs of approximately $306 billion—a new U.S. annual record.”

The federal agency listed several noteworthy events, including the wildfires in the west, with total costs of $18 billion, tripling the previous U.S. annual wildfire cost record.

INEOS Shale to Challenge Scottish Fracking Ban in the Courts – 'Predictable and Desperate' say Opponents

Scotland bans fracking

By Ruth Hayhurst, DrillOrDrop

INEOS Shale announced today it has lodged a petition to challenge the Scottish Government’s decision to “effectively ban” onshore unconventional oil and gas extraction.

Opponents of fracking have described the news as predictable and desperate. The company was accused of “trying to keep alive its hope of ever making any money out of a toxic industry”. The Scottish Government said this afternoon the ban had been reached in “a careful and considered approach”.

Scotland’s Energy Minister, Paul Wheelhouse, announced on 3 October 2017 a new planning policy of no support for fracking in Scotland. This followed a two-year period of research and consultation. The decision was backed by the Scottish parliament on 24 October 2017.

Trump's Offshore Oil Drilling Plans Ignore the Lessons of BP Deepwater Horizon Spill

Boat skimming oil in the Gulf of Mexico during Deepwater Horizon BP oil spill

By Donald Boesch, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science

The Trump administration is proposing to ease regulations that were adopted to make offshore oil and gas drilling operations safer after the 2010 Deepwater Horizon disaster. This event was the worst oil spill in U.S. history. Eleven workers died in the explosion and sinking of the oil rig, and more than 4 million barrels of oil were released into the Gulf of Mexico. Scientists have estimated that the spill caused more than US$17 billion in damages to natural resources.

I served on the bipartisan National Commission that investigated the causes of this epic blowout. We spent six months assessing what went wrong on the Deepwater Horizon and the effectiveness of the spill response, conducting our own investigations and hearing testimony from dozens of expert witnesses.

Public Transport Price Hikes Are Costing the Commuter and the Climate

UK rail price hikes costing commuter and climate

Op-ed by Stephen Joseph, Chief Executive, Campaign for Better Transport

The New Year was marked, as in previous years, by rises in rail fares and lots of press coverage. Campaign for Better Transport has been using the coverage to make the case for simpler, fairer and cheaper rail fares with our Fair Fares Now campaign. This is important for rail users, for whom constant fares rises have immediate economic impacts. But as an environmental group, we’ve been making the case for fares policy to be looked at more broadly.

Canada's North Needs Many Things, But Oil and Gas Drilling Isn't One of Them

The Norman Wells pipeline connects oil fields in the Northwest Territories to Alberta

By Edward Struzik

This article was originally published on The Conversation Canada.

Northwest Territories Premier Bob McLeod was right when he issued a “red alert” in November and called for an urgent national debate on the future of the Northwest Territories. His peers, the premiers of Nunavut and the Yukon Territory, would be justified in calling for the same thing.

Why Americans Will Never Agree on Oil Drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

Mountains and meadows in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge
By Scott L. Montgomery, University of Washington

After decades of bitter struggle, the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge seems on the verge of being opened to the oil industry. The consensus tax bill Republicans recently passed retains this measure, which was added to gain the key vote of Alaska Sen. Lisa Murkowski.

This bill, however, stands no chance of being the final word. ANWR has been called America’s Serengeti and the last petroleum frontier, terms I’ve seen used over more than a decade studying this area and the politics around it. But even these titles merely hint at the multifold conflict ANWR represents — spanning politics, economics, culture and philosophy.

Exxon Mobil’s About-Face on Climate Disclosure

ExxonMobil protesters hold signs

By Paul Griffin, University of California, Davis

Exxon Mobil Corp. has vowed to do a better job in disclosing the risks it faces from climate change starting “in the near future” after bucking pressure to do that for years.

Until now, shareholders and bondholders had no choice but to rely on informed guesswork by outsiders to divine how the nation’s largest fossil fuel company was retooling for the future — a time when taxes, regulations and competition from renewable energy and other new technology alternatives are likely to thin consumers’ demand for its products.

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