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Atlantic Coast Pipeline Corporate Backers Fund Faulty Pro-Pipeline Poll

Pipeline construction sign

This is a guest post by  and originally appeared on LittleSis.org.

On May 9th, 2017, a group called EnergySure tweeted:

Are Solar and Wind Really Killing Coal, Nuclear, and Grid Reliability?

Rick Perry and the Texas power grid

By Joshua D. RhodesMichael E. WebberThomas Deetjen, and Todd Davidson, University of Texas at Austin

U.S. Secretary of Energy Rick Perry in April requested a study to assess the effect of renewable energy policies on nuclear and coal-fired power plants. The Conversation

Some energy analysts responded with confusion, as the subject has been extensively studied by grid operators and the Department of Energy’s own national labs. Others were more critical, saying the intent of the review is to favor the use of nuclear and coal over renewable sources.

So, are wind and solar killing coal and nuclear? Yes, but not by themselves and not for the reasons most people think.

People Don’t Trust Scientific Research When Companies Are Involved

lab coats

By John C. Besley, Aaron M. McCright, Kevin Elliott, and Nagwan Zahry of Michigan State University and Joseph D. Martin of University of Leeds

A soda company sponsoring nutrition research. An oil conglomerate helping fund a climate-related research meeting. Does the public care who’s paying for science? The Conversation

In a word, yes. When industry funds science, credibility suffers. And this does not bode well for the types of public-private research partnerships that appear to be becoming more prevalent as government funding for research and development lags.

Read This Excerpt From 'Horsemen of the Apocalypse'

By Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. (crossposted from EcoWatch)

This is an excerpt from Dick Russell's and my new book, Horsemen of the Apocalypse, an eye opening exposé of the people and corporations most responsible for today's climate crisis and their roles in President Trump's new administration.

Bret Stephens Continues Shoveling BS into NY Times Opinion Section

By ClimateDenierRoundup

Here we go again. Bret Stephens, apparently riding high on a wave of hate-clicks, has another column that yet again deceives readers with a bait and switch.

In his second column, Stephens takes on ethanol, a worthy topic for inquiry: the benefits of ethanol are questionable when the full life cycle is considered. Which is why the Sierra Club is opposed to it, NRDC pointed out problems back in 2010, and the NY Times editorial board itself expressed its opposition in 2008. (So much for Stephens bringing diversity…)

But instead of diving into an honest argument, Stephens sets up a strawman to burn down.

Trump’s Offshore Oil Drilling Push: Five Essential Reads

Shell's Arctic drilling rig the Kulluk aground in Alaska

By Martin LaMonica, The Conversation

This article is based on a collection of archival stories. The Conversation

When it comes to energy, perhaps the only thing President Trump loves more than coal is oil and gas. Just a day shy of 100 days into his presidency, Trump signed an executive order to open more offshore oil drilling in U.S. waters.

The move is meant to spur the economy and reverse President Obama’s decision last December to ban drilling from large swaths of sensitive marine environments. Regardless of whether Trump succeeds in overturning Obama’s protections, it’s clear oil won’t be flowing from new offshore wells anytime soon.

What Makes Climate Science Deniers Change Their Minds? A Reddit Confessional Gave Us a Rare Insight

Mash-up of Reddit user posts about why they changed their minds about climate change

This is a guest post by Karin Kirk, crossposted with permission from Yale Climate Connections.

The political environment in America is gripped by deep polarization. No news flash there.

Throughout the Presidential campaign and in the initial months of the Trump presidency, the public and their national politicians dig themselves ever deeper into entrenched positions, leaving little hope for compromise or reconciliation.

But sometimes people do the unimaginable: they change their minds.

An AskReddit discussion poses a tantalizing question, “Former climate deniers, what changed your mind?” 

US Business Schools Failing on Climate Change

Laptop computer on a tree stump

By Nancy E. Landrum, Loyola University Chicago

Coca-Cola and Nestlé have recently closed facilities, and Starbucks is bracing for a global shortage of coffee — all due to effects from climate change. Climate change impacts every resource used by businesses: from agriculture, water, land and energy to workers and the economy. No business will be untouched. The Conversation

As a researcher and professor of business management, I have found that sustainable business courses across the U.S. do not align with the scientific consensus that we need radical change to avert disastrous consequences of climate change.

These future business leaders are not being prepared for the climate change challenges their companies are certain to face.

Four Good Reasons to March for Science this Weekend (and One Bad Reason for Going)

Scientists march

On Saturday, thousands of people in over 500 hundred marches will take to the streets to call for governments to support and fund scientific enquiry. Dr Alice Bell — campaigner, writer and researcher in the public engagement with science and technology — outlines why it’s important for people to support the global March for Science.

Dominion Bets Big on Establishment Candidates Northam, Gillespie in Virginia Governor's Race

This is a guest post by David Pomerantz, crossposted from Energy and Policy Institute

Virginia’s monopoly electric utility, Dominion Energy, has thrown its chips behind two establishment candidates for governor, Democrat Ralph Northam and Republican Ed Gillespie, in hopes that they can fend off populist primary opponents in both parties who have turned the utility into a campaign punching bag.

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