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LNG Canada Project Called a 'Tax Giveaway' as BC Approves Massive Subsidies

Read time: 8 mins
John Horgan and Justin Trudeau

By , The Narwhal. Originally posted on The Narwhal.

Fracked gas export project will be B.C.’s largest carbon polluter

There was a telling comment from Shell Global’s Maarten Wetselaar — representing five multinational investors in a CAN$40 billion project to ship B.C. liquefied natural gas to Asia — amidst the hoopla that accompanied Tuesday’s LNG announcement.

How This Man’s Legal Challenge Could Stall the LNG Canada Fracked Gas Project

Read time: 8 mins
Michael Sawyer

By , The Narwhal. Originally posted on The Narwhal.

A massive new fracked gas export plant in Kitimat, British Columbia, may have just received the go-ahead, but a Smithers resident is arguing a pipeline vital to the project should have faced a federal review — and he’s won before.

Why Californians Are Worried About the Trans Mountain Pipeline

Read time: 8 mins
Sign protesting tar sands and Phillips 66 refinery expansion in Rodeo, California

By , The Narwhal. Originally posted on The Narwhal.

Canadians might imagine Burnaby as the main site of protest against the Trans Mountain oil pipeline and tanker project, the Vancouver suburb marked as it is by dozens of peaceful demonstrations, arrests and associated court challenges in recent years.

But a new line of opposition is now being drawn on sandy beaches some 1,300 kilometres to the south — in the Bay Area of California. There, residents are increasingly concerned that the expansion of Trans Mountain may result in a major uptick in tankers carrying Alberta oilsands crude to the region’s five refineries, which comes with increased risks of spills, local air pollution, refinery accidents and a locking in of fossil fuel usage for decades to come.

Don't Frack so Close to me: Colorado Voters Will Weigh in on Drilling Distances From Homes and Schools

Read time: 6 mins
Flare at a fracking site near a house in Colorado
By Tara Opsal and Stephanie Malin, Colorado State University

Coloradans will vote on a ballot initiative in November that requires new oil and gas projects to be set back at least 2,500 feet from occupied buildings. If approved, the measure — known as both Initiative 97 and Proposition 112 — would mark a major change from their state’s current limits: 500 feet from homes and 1,000 feet from schools.

As sociologists who have researched oil and gas drilling in the communities that host it for the past seven years, we think this measure would provide local governments and Coloradans more say over where drilling occurs and enhance the rights of those who live near these sites.

KXL Pipeline Developer Plans to Start Construction in 2019

Read time: 4 mins
Woman holding a protest sign against Keystone XL reading 'Stop the pipeline'

By Lorraine Chow, EcoWatch. Reposted with permission from EcoWatch.

Construction on the long-delayed Keystone XL (KXL) pipeline is planned for 2019, developer TransCanada said Monday.

“Keystone XL has undergone years of extensive environmental review by federal and state regulators,” TransCanada spokesman Matthew John told Omaha World-Herald. “All of these evaluations show that Keystone XL can be built safely and with minimal impact to the environment.”

Relaxed Environmental Regulations Heighten Risk During Natural Disasters

Read time: 6 mins
Hurricane flooded home
By Brian J. Gerber and Melanie Gall, Arizona State University

Heavy rains following Hurricane Florence have raised concerns over the release of toxic materials. Ash from coal-fired power plants stored at a landfill has spilled out and the state of North Carolina has said dozens of sites have released hog waste or are at risk of doing so.

These types of events not only highlight the potential of harm to humans and the environment due to this type of uncontrolled pollution, but also the linkage between environmental regulations and the risks communities face when natural disasters occur.

Top EPA Watchdog Since 2010 Announces Departure

Read time: 3 mins
Arthur Elkins EPA Inspector General

By Olivia Rosane, EcoWatch. Reposted with permission from EcoWatch.

The head of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) internal watchdog organization announced plans to leave for a job outside the federal government Tuesday, The Associated Press reported.

Arthur A. Elkins Jr., who has held the position of Inspector General since he was appointed by former president Barack Obama in 2010, will spend his last day at the agency October 12, The Hill reported.

Trump Admin Accelerates Push to Export Fracking to Argentina

Read time: 7 mins
Rick Perry and energy ministers at G20 Summit in Argentina

By Joseph Siess

In June, U.S. Secretary of Energy Rick Perry traveled to Bariloche, Argentina, for a G20 Summit where he expressed his desire to help Argentina become more like Texas, his home state.

The technology that has allowed for the shale gas revolution in America, we want to make available to Argentina,” Perry said.

At the summit, which was intended to focus on a transition to cleaner energy, Perry instead pledged the U.S. Department of Energy’s support in helping Argentina exploit its vast fossil fuel resources. Namely by connecting the nation with U.S. companies that know how to extract shale oil and gas via hydraulic fracturing (fracking).

But DOE isn’t the only part of the U.S. government facilitating fracking in Argentina. Under the Trump administration, the Departments of Interior and State — working closely with Pennsylvania State University — have been involved in multiple workshops focused on developing shale oil and gas in the South American nation.   

Climate Damages and Deception: Panel Reviews California Legal Actions Against Fossil Fuel Industry

Read time: 5 mins

By Kaya Axelsson

In San Francisco this week, Fossil Free California hosted a panel discussion on the most recent municipal litigation against the fossil fuel industry.

Last year, San Francisco and Oakland sued the world’s five largest investor-owned fossil fuel producers over predicted climate change costs to these cities.

Buried, Altered, Silenced: 4 Ways Government Climate Information Has Changed Since Trump Took Office

Read time: 5 mins

By Morgan Currie, Stanford University and Britt S. Paris, University of California, Los Angeles

After Donald Trump won the presidential election, hundreds of volunteers around the U.S. came together to “rescue” federal data on climate change, thought to be at risk under the new administration. “Guerilla archivists,” including ourselves, gathered to archive federal websites and preserve scientific data.

But what has happened since? Did the data vanish?

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